Paul McCartney apareix en forma d'holograma en el seu nou videoclip

Exclusive: Paul McCartney Stars as a Hologram in His New Music Video

Peter Rubin. WIRED. 12/08/2014

Paul McCartney (or “Sir P,” as we have him saved in our phone) has had quite the surprising 2014. First he wrote and recorded “Hope For the Future,” a song for Activision’s massively successful videogame Destiny—the first time he’d ever written specifically for a game. Then, last month, he worked with Jaunt VR to turn his Candlestick Park concert in August into a virtual-reality experience. Now, he completes the high-tech trifecta by not just releasing “Hope For the Future” this week as a standalone song, along with four remixes, but by pairing them with a video that brings him into the world of Destiny. And he was kind enough to give us the worldwide exclusive.

In the video, above, McCartney appears in the 28th-century game universe as a hologram—serenading various Guardians via projection from a Ghost AI assistant. (In the game your character’s Ghost was voiced, somewhat clunkily, by Peter Dinklage, making this quite an upgrade.) And just as in the game, the song’s grandeur perfectly matches the often jaw-dropping landscapes. If that doesn’t sate your appetite for “Hope For the Future” goodness, we’ve also got the exclusive stream of one of the song’s remixes. You go ahead and enjoy; we’ll be busy trying to figure out what tech-savvy shenanigans Sir Paul’s got up his sleeves for next year.

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Paul McCartney apareix en forma d'holograma en el seu nou videoclip

Exclusive: Paul McCartney Stars as a Hologram in His New Music Video

Peter Rubin. WIRED. 12/08/2014

Paul McCartney (or “Sir P,” as we have him saved in our phone) has had quite the surprising 2014. First he wrote and recorded “Hope For the Future,” a song for Activision’s massively successful videogame Destiny—the first time he’d ever written specifically for a game. Then, last month, he worked with Jaunt VR to turn his Candlestick Park concert in August into a virtual-reality experience. Now, he completes the high-tech trifecta by not just releasing “Hope For the Future” this week as a standalone song, along with four remixes, but by pairing them with a video that brings him into the world of Destiny. And he was kind enough to give us the worldwide exclusive.

In the video, above, McCartney appears in the 28th-century game universe as a hologram—serenading various Guardians via projection from a Ghost AI assistant. (In the game your character’s Ghost was voiced, somewhat clunkily, by Peter Dinklage, making this quite an upgrade.) And just as in the game, the song’s grandeur perfectly matches the often jaw-dropping landscapes. If that doesn’t sate your appetite for “Hope For the Future” goodness, we’ve also got the exclusive stream of one of the song’s remixes. You go ahead and enjoy; we’ll be busy trying to figure out what tech-savvy shenanigans Sir Paul’s got up his sleeves for next year.

Llegir la notícia original aquí.

El futur és hologràfic. Però què és un holograma i què no?

El futuro es holográfico

La investigación científica de esta tecnología explota con aplicaciones revolucionarias

  • GRÁFICO Qué es un holograma y qué no lo es
  • El País,  26 OCT 2014 –
    “Ayúdame Obi Wan Kenobi, eres mi única esperanza”. No era la actriz Carrie Fisher repitiendo una de tantas citas legendarias de La guerra de las galaxias. Era una estudiante del MIT, vestida de princesa Leia, demostrando que transmitir en vídeo un holograma, uno de los sueños de siempre de la ciencia ficción, era ya una realidad. La cruz de la moneda que, tres años después de la experiencia, “aún recibe correos de fans. Y no le gusta. No quiere que la conozcan como la princesa Leia porque está haciendo cosas mucho más interesantes”, revela su profesor, Michael Bove (Missouri, 1960), líder de un equipo de investigación en el Media Lab del MIT.

    Más allá de la anécdota, la tecnología holográfica vive un momento dulce. Aplicaciones para la salud prometen simplificar el diagnóstico médico con dispositivos no mayores que la yema de un pulgar. En el mundo de la informática, estas esculturas de luz pueden llegar a multiplicar en un lustro la cantidad de memoria disponible en los ordenadores. En China, la compañía Takee Technology le ganó la partida al futuro móvil de Amazon mostrando un smartphone capaz de crear estas imágenes en 3D. Microsoft y Skype investigan cómo revolucionar la videoconferencia con holografías de los interlocutores. Y hace un par de semanas, Apple patentó un dispositivo para poder tocar e interactuar con estas imágenes.
    (…)

    Las imágenes estáticas holográficas ya son posibles. Pero esas ilusiones tridimensionales e interactivas que ha recreado Hollywood en superproducciones como Prometheuso Iron Man aún tienen mucho trecho por delante. El Media Lab del MIT es puntero en conseguir video holográfico. En 2011, conseguir plasmar muy rudimentariamente a una falsa Princesa Leia. Ahora han llegado a proyectar en el espacio a una resolución aún baja: 640×480 píxeles.

    “Para que un holograma se mueva, para tener vídeo en alta definición, necesitamos hacer los píxeles mucho más pequeños. Tan pequeños como para meter unos 2.000 en un milímetro cuadrado”, explica Michael Bove, director de un grupo de investigación en el Media. Y hay otros desafíos: “Nuestras pantallas de momento son como las de las teles antiguas, cajas. Estamos refinando la tecnología para conseguir que sean planas”.

    Pero el equipo de Bove ya ha conseguido vislumbrar ese futuro: “Mis estudiantes han logrado ya hologramas para una pantalla del tamaño equivalente a un smartphone. De ahí a una televisión holográfica que usar en casa queda mucho. Tal vez unos 10 años para que podamos ver las primeras aplicaciones comerciales”. Pero por mucho que prometa la tecnología, el sueño de ver a Leia flotando en el aire desde cualquier ángulo aún no está resuelto. Porque todo holograma conocido se proyecta desde una pantalla. Es decir, que Leia, vista desde el lugar equivocado, sería solo una voz suplicando: “Ayúdame Obi-Wan Kenobi, eres mi última esperanza”.

    Hatsune Miku visita David Letterman

    Who (or what) is Hatsune Miku? The making of a virtual pop star

    Doug Levy. The Next Web via Shutterstock blog. 18/10/2014

    Last week, mainstream America — and David Letterman — was introduced to one of Japan’s most intriguing phenomenons, the virtual star known as Hatsune Miku. Making a holographic appearance as the musical guest on the Late Night host’s show, Miku was joined by a live band to perform a song chosen specifically for special live performances in the US this month.

    If it all left Dave (and others) a bit confused, it’s not without reason: Miku is much more than just an animated star in the vein of Gorillaz. Rather, she’s a representation of the evolution of digital music technology, crowdsourcing, and creative collaboration.

    Technically, Hatsune Miku is a program — a vocal synthesizer called a Vocaloid, developed by Japanese software company Crypton Future Media. She’s not the only one, but she is the most popular, with a rapidly growing fan base worldwide. Anyone can buy the Vocaloid and use it to create songs; everything Miku performs live was created by members of a burgeoning global community, with tens of thousands of songs featuring her voice uploaded since its launch in 2007.

    Over 4,000 of those songs are now commercially available via Miku’s record label, Karent, and her avatar has even opened for Lady Gaga on tour.

    To help make a little more sense of it all, and to get all the details on Miku’s 2014 Expo, which brings her to a New York stage this weekend in conjunction with an NYC gallery exhibition, we spoke with Cosima Oka-Doerge, US/EU Marketing Manager at Crypton Future Media.

    Shutterstock: Do you find it difficult to explain who/what Hatsune Miku is to people who aren’t familiar with her?

    Cosima Oka-Doerge: Oh yes, definitely. Most of the reactions people have when they first see or hear about Miku are very biased, but once we have the chance to start explaining what Hatsune Miku really is and how it started out, we get very positive reactions. There’s a lot to explain and it’s difficult to cut something down to a simple answer.

    Miku is a new concept in so many ways: as a music program and virtual singing synthesizer; as a projection on stage performing with a live band; as an interface for people to communicate their creations; as a collectively constructed pop star; the list goes on. (…)

    When the avatar was first created, did anyone expect her to become the phenomenon she is today?

    That’s difficult to say, but we at least expected that the software itself would have an impact that goes beyond our usual target of music producers. In 2007, the technology for voice synthesis had improved immensely, already creating quite a buzz among music producers. But with the character illustration, and actually giving the voice of the software a face, we hoped to give the software a broader audience, which really worked out and enabled users to get inspired and to create new artworks around Hatsune Miku.

    Another factor for the fast growth of Miku’s popularity was that, in 2007, many video sharing services were emerging, so creators had places where they could present their music and videos to the whole world. (…) We were very aware of this development, and reacted by building a free content-sharing site in Japan, piapro.jp, that aims at being a platform where users can upload their creations and easily find partners for collaborations. That was a huge factor for the fast growth of Hatsune Miku followers.

    What do you think Hatsune Miku’s success says about the future of music, art, and collaboration?

    This is a very interesting question. I think it says that the world has changed in terms of how we perceive and consume content, from a relatively receptive audience to an active-participatory one.

    When Miku was released, it immediately tapped into this newly arising consciousness, and I believe it filled the blank spot that was missing in this vastness of “being connected” with the whole world: the factor of having a joint interface for mutual collaborations, of actual realization and output of the new awareness of bottom-up, instead of top-down, structures of creation and the music business itself. Miku inspired so many around the world, really becoming an icon for this movement, where creation is available for everyone. (…)

    Is Hatsune Miku more popular with creators or with general fans now? Do you feel any need to manage how she’s presented in the media?

    I would say that she is equally popular among creators and fans. Also, the culture around Miku is so complex and versatile that it’s even hard to draw a line between who are the fans and who are the creators. We have the most amazing comments from young people around the world, often describing that although they weren’t interested in art or any sort of creation until now, with Miku they developed a curiosity, a desire of wanting to create something. Now we have all these amazing people finding something they are good at. It has really no limit. In addition to music and illustrations, we have fans and creators posting their videos of special Miku dance moves, even cooking with Miku — all sorts of lifestyle areas are covered. Being a fan or creator in the Miku culture, it’s quite a blurry line, I think.

    With the sheer amount of content created using the character, how do you sort through it all when you’re deciding what to spotlight?

    It is a crazy amount. We only manage by knowing where and how to look. For example, we look up what’s popular in the community by the number of views on NicoNico or YouTube, reading comments, and then considering which songs work well together for the whole setlist of a concert. This includes the collaborative artworks between the various users, like illustrations and costume designs that go along with the songs, which works nicely for presenting Miku in various styles throughout the show.

    What’s the most impressive or unexpected thing you’ve seen someone do with the character?

    There are so many amazing artworks with Miku, it’s hard to pin it down to a single one. Basically, it covers any area in which artists would create new works — music, illustration, stage presentations, dance moves, 3D modeling and so much more. There’s even a whole opera made with Hatsune Miku that traveled to Paris and was on stage in the famous Théâtre du Châtelet. It’s called The End: A Vocaloid Opera by Keiichiro Shibuya.

    (…)

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    Julian Assange xerra a Nantucket… com a holograma

    Wikileaks’ Julian Assange turns up on stage in Nantucket – as a hologram

    Digital Trends, — September 30, 2014

    Julian Assange turned up on a stage in Massachusetts on Sunday, even though he’s still firmly holed up in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London.

    So how did he do that?

    Thanks to tech company Hologram USA, the Wikileaks founder was able have his image reconstructed live on stage at The Nantucket Project, an annual bash that brings together “the world’s leading thinkers, visionaries, and performers” for some informal chit-chat and social shenanigans.

    If the name of the company rings a bell, that might be because it was also behind the famous reappearance of Tupac in 2012. A legal spat concerning the Michael Jackson holographic performance in May also landed it in the news just the other day.

    While Tupac and Jackson are sadly no longer with us, Assange is most definitely still knocking around, albeit within an Ecuadorian-owned building in London. However, due to his self-imposed confinement at the embassy – to avoid extradition to Sweden where he faces questioning over alleged sex assaults – Assange doesn’t get out much, or at all, to be exact.

    While he’s been able to do print interviews and appear online from the embassy via services like Skype, this is the first time since he turned up at the embassy two years ago that he’s gone all 3D on us.

    Interviewed by filmmaker Eugene Jarecki, the feat (excerpt below) involved a camera at the embassy, satellite trucks in London and Nantucket, and some very powerful projectors. The live interview saw a life-size Assange (well, it would’ve looked a bit silly if he was only 30 cm tall) appearing on stage alongside Jarecki. (…)

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    Apple crea un dispositiu per tocar hologrames

    El dispositivo permitirá tocar con las manos las imágenes proyectadas en 3D

    EL PAÍS. 1/10/2014

    “Sin visores o gafas 3D”. “Sin un medio reflectante”. Esa es la revolución que promete la “interactive holographic display device” (dispositivo de interacción holográfica), una nueva patente de Apple publicada ayer por la oficina de patentes del Gobierno de Estados Unidos, según informó Pattently Apple, un blog dedicado a reflejar las innovaciones de esta compañía. Bastará con el móvil o la tablet para que estas imágenes en tres dimensiones se proyecten en el espacio e interactúen con el usuario.

    Christopher Horst Krah, investigador estadounidense de Los Altos (California), es el único inventor del proyecto, aunque aún no ha hecho declaraciones de ningún tipo. El resumen de su invento, que se puede consultar en la web de la oficina de patentes, detalla cómo funciona el sistema con diversos diagramas, indicando que se podría emplear no solo para iphones y tabletas, sino también para ordenadores.

    Fotograma de la película ‘Avatar’ que muestra un holograma interactivo

    La patente explica así su funcionamiento: “La información de una imagen se transmite a uno o varios haces que generan una imagen holográfica del objeto. Uno o más sensores ópticos pueden configurarse para obtener información para detectar la ubicación de un dispositivo interactivo (por ejemplo: el dedo de un usuario) respecto al holograma”. Hay que tener en cuenta que Apple registra muchas patentes que no logran desarrollar un prototipo viable.

    Es la segunda patente que Apple lanza sobre holografía. El 20 de marzo de 2008 se publicó el registro de otro invento para desarrollar hologramas interactivos e individualizados. La tecnología a desarrollar prometía hologramas visibles sin necesidad de visores desde todos los ángulos. Muchos museos, como el Arqueológico de Madrid, ya utilizan esta tecnología para reconstruir realidades del pasado. Y la medicina ya se encuentra investigando su utilidad para los diagnósticos.

    El pasado domingo, estos viejos sueños de la ciencia ficción volvían a demostrar que son una realidad muy palpable. Julian Assange, fundador de Wikileaks, dio una conferencia en Massachusetts. Estaba allí pero también a un océano del instante, en la embajada ecuatoriana de Londres.